The way of all flesh…

guillotine

As is frequently the case, life has a habit of curtailing one’s passions, unless one’s passions are one’s life. As a father of three, husband and all-around working stiff, my passions, such as they are, often get pushed to the curb until such a time as the pile of it gets so… monumental… well, it gets time to pick up the rubbish and dispose of it.

Not that my passions are rubbish. Far from it.

WHAT a crazy season this has been so far in the Prem! Who would have thought Chelsea would be in the predicament in which they find themselves at this moment. Reports surfaced recently that Jose Mourinho is all out of time at Stamford Bridge, that the powers that be are awaiting until the end of the Stoke match this weekend to give the man the boot. This would have given them the international break to install his successor, a la Liverpool. It has since been reported that Mourinho retains the support of Chelsea’s deep-pocketed owner Roman Abramovich, but we all know how much that is worth these days. Chelski lost that game to Stoke, by the way.

This turn of events beggars belief, but is almost understandable given recent controversy surrounding the Portuguese schemer. Everywhere you look, Mourinho seems to be mentioned for all the wrong reasons: everything from the fallout of the Eva Carneiro fiasco to multiple stadium bans and fines, and even reports of a mutiny in the locker room led by everyone’s favorite sourpuss Cesc Fabregas (both deny the allegations). All signs point toward the Special One suddenly going from flavor of the month to something of a toxic asset. Where did it all go so wrong?

The Daily Mail, using its guise as an investigative news outlet, published this piece about all that has gone wrong old Jose. There are some pieces worth noting, though: Mourinho’s father, Felix, is apparently very ill and on his last legs. Mourinho has gone back and forth to Portugal often this season and one can see that the man is taking strain. One gets the feeling that a few misplaced words at the beginning of the season, coupled with the man’s mountain-sized ego and unwillingness to back down have contributed to what is becoming an untenable situation. I wonder if he had simply admitted he’d overreacted to Carneiro’s coming on the field to tend to Eden Hazard, if he’d defused that situation or, better, controlled his tongue and not said anything at all, whether he’d have a better grip on things right now.

Perhaps the problems started a little earlier, during the transfer window. Mourinho’s very public pursuit of Everton defender John Stones ended in futility, much to his embarrassment. How does a seemingly “small” club (when compared to the London giants) bat back such assiduous pursuit of one of their prize assets? Who do they think they are, Mourinho appeared to imply in his blustering comments. His inability to recruit adequate cover in that department, along with the ill-advised decision to allow Petr Cech to join Arsenal, seem to have called in to question his up-to-now unquestionable transfer nous.

How bad is it right now at Stamford Bridge, really? Does it make any sense in the world to sack a man who not six months ago brought home the Prem title at a canter with this same squad? Football is not the province of sense, reason or good taste, and as such the previous statements ought to be laughed off. This club is owned by none other than Roman Abramovich, a man accustomed to having everything he wants, right now, immediately, always. He went to some lengths to bury to hatchet between himself and Mourinho in order to woo the man back into the fold, and it now appears he may very well unearth it and bury the implement firmly in Jose’s back. It is so not beyond him it’s not funny.

The report on Mourinho’s imminent sacking came from a reliable source, and as such could not be discounted. Whether the latest pronouncement from the Bridge is a temporary stay of execution or a vote of confidence is to be seen. One hopes he hangs around, if for no other reason than the Premier League benefits from having a panto villian such as the Portuguese schemer. Still, Mourinho might have made his situation untenable.

It cannot be overstated that the situation with Eva Carneiro is unacceptable. In this day and age, a public figure of Mourinho’s clout cannot come across as a sexist pig, and there is no question that he did. The Football Association carried out an investigation, but never bothered to contact Ms Carneiro, which only further served to exacerbate the situation. How her input on this whole situation was deemed to be immaterial is truly beyond me, but it has now shown that the sexism is not focused simply on an individual, but is systemic. Carneiro was done very wrong in this sad debacle and goes to show that sexism in sport is not going to go away any time soon.

Mourinho’s inability to dislodge John Stones from Everton may have been the only well-publicized bit of transfer failure that we were made aware of. Chelsea did not reinforce their forward line, and Diego Costa showed that he has a niggle or two in him last season. We were all left to scratch our heads with the move for Colombian Radmael Falcão, who failed rather miserably to re-ignite his career at Manchester United last season. The Blues brought in Pedro from Barcelona for a significant outlay, but he has so far failed to make a real impression. We all know Loic Remy is just a backup. So Chelsea’s front line is, amazingly, in kind of a bad way. Perhaps Pedro was expected to hit the ground running. There have been reports that he is unhappy at the Bridge and wish he’d never left the Nou Camp.

Questions must be asked of Chelsea’s recruitment policy, if one indeed exists. The Blues currently have 32 of their players out on loan. That is not a typo. Chelsea have more out on loan than my beloved Toffees have on their books. While that last statement is not exactly true (it would appear the Toffees have 43 players signed up altogether), it does give one pause when you compare the roster of, say, Everton to Chelsea’s. Clearly, both clubs have increased focus on bringing in younger, unproven talent. It’s just that Chelsea have done on a much grander scale, and have sent the equivalent of a squad and its bench out on loan with a view to, potentially, plowing them back into the team.

Some get away. Everton has benefited from this policy, as has Man City (with Kevin De Bruyne, although via Wolfsburg). These aren’t exactly slouches. It would appear Chelsea’s scattershot style of recruiting young talent with great potential is netting results, but not for them. That is because these kids keep leaving due to annoyance at a perceived lack of chances. How many of this current loan crop will wind up back at the Bridge?

There’s a bit of arrogance in this policy: go out and scoop up as much young, raw talent and if they work out, great. At least the competition didn’t get them. The problem lies in whether they will live to rue the day they sold a world beater to a competitor or if they are unable to recoup some of the outlay. It’s a dangerous thing to spend a rich man’s money. If the results are good, then all is forgiven. If not…

That is probably where this is all going. Whether he’s acting like more of an ass than usual because of his father’s illness is neither here nor there. It is not up for debate whether Mourinho is everyone’s cup of tea; the man clearly divides opinion. If he continues to bring home the bacon, then much of his eccentricity can be written off. If not, then no. The Carneiro incident has proven he can be shockingly tone deaf to the mores of the times, while his spending can always lead to an inquest if the outlay does not net results. Pedro has been, so far, a costly mistake, while Falcão’s wages aren’t exactly bargain basement either. Fabregas was unstoppable last season but has not impressed this one. Nemanja Matic has not been at his best. Of course John Terry is slowing down, it’s why Mourinho chased Stones all summer. Expensive players, expensive contracts.

Still… Mourinho is a fan favorite. He is not going to be shown the door so soon. The recent vote of confidence might only be a stay of execution but really, who better is available? Rumors have circulated for what seems like forever that Abramovich’s deepest wish is to install Pep Guardiola as manager, but the Spanish tactician might be given bumper incentive to stay in Bavaria.

After having gone to such lengths to convince Mourinho to come back to the Bridge, perhaps Abramovich’s best bet is to allow this supposed top manager lead this team out of its rut. That being said, Mourinho could do worse than to polish up his public persona. He has always been a complainer, but this season he has managed to take that to new highs (or lows). As has been noted elsewhere, a bit of humility couldn’t hurt. Results are great, but character is better. I wonder if he has it in him?

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